Storming the CASL: What About In-Person Spam?

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Today, Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL – playfully pronounced “castle”) took effect, primarily focused on Commercial Electronic Messages. It is regarded by many as the world’s toughest stance on spam by any government body. Interesting that it’s launching on Canada Day, perhaps sending some subliminal message of strength and patriotism.

In this post, I will make no judgements, commentary, or declare my opinion about CASL itself – there are plenty of people already doing that. In the end, I am against spam and unwanted communications, and the effect they have on those of us who are trying to communicate properly, meaningfully and respectfully. It desensitizes and jades people to communications and creates a population of annoyed cynics – and who can blame them for becoming that way.

My question is, what about in-person spam? Here are some examples of what I mean:

  • You just meet someone and they are trying to sell you and close you from the first sentence
  • At an event, you see someone who is rapid-firing out their business card at anyone who will take it, and doesn’t bother getting to actually know anyone
  • Someone is not listening to you at all in a conversation and just keeps talking over you, through you and around you
  • People who express views from a place of hatred and exclusion, such as racists and bigots
  • An acquaintance who is always asking for something and never offers anything in return

  • What we really need is a shared understanding of what is appropriate, and to respect each other enough abide by that understanding. Rather than trying to get louder and noisier to make your voice heard, maybe what you really need to do is listen.

    To stop yourself before from becoming an in-person spammer:

  • Listen well and really get to know people
  • Ask questions and practice curiosity to increase your understanding
  • Heighten your self-awareness and the impact you have on others
  • Make sure you understand how people want to be treated and then do that
  • Ensure all of your communications are meaningful and respectful, and not just about you all the time.

  • This brief conversation of tweets from two respected friends says it all – and applies no matter what channel you’re using. This is in response to the flurry of emails Canadians have been receiving to obtain “opt-in” explicit consent for ongoing communications, many of which have been less than stellar.

    Spam is spam, wherever it’s coming from.

    Constant Questions: Have you ever experienced in-person spam? What is the worst story you have? How do you think we can avoid it? Have you ever actually eaten Spam or its lesser known cousin Klik?

    The ultimate SPAM video!

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